History of Magic 101 — Assignment: Lesson 2

HOM-101 Assignment: Lesson 2

Theories on the Origin of Magic

Of the 3 plausible theories of how magic came to be, the Theory of Hocus Pocus seems most likely.  There’s evidence, such as the Birch Bark Manuscript, supporting the idea that magic naturally started out of thin air.

This theory could very well explain the Theory of Uno Mas, which is the belief that all magic originated from one person: Uno Mas, meaning ‘The First Magi’.  Should the theory be proven right, that Uno was indeed the first wizard to use magic and the first to create a wand, and that he lived in the time of the dinosaurs and before cavemen, it still merely explains who used magic first but not how magic started.  According to the Theory of Hocus Pocus, it must have come our of thin air from a natural progression of magical tendencies.

It could also explain the Migration Theory, the view that witches and wizards lived side-by-side with Muggles for years, unaware that they had magic.  Many of the Wizarding villages that exist today were founded by the early witches and wizards who left the Muggles when the Descent of Blizz occurred (the Ice Age, in Muggle terms).  However, it is still the Theory of Hocus Pocus that describes the origin of magic.

Rather than focusing solely on who first used magic, it is much more useful to focus mainly on the first known uses of magic.  And this is precisely what the Theory of Hocus Pocus attempts to do.

History of Magic 101 — Assignment: Lesson 1

HOM-101 Assignment - Lesson 1

HOM-101 Assignment: Lesson 1

       Before the first lesson of the History of Magic, the topic of history was never a particular fancy of mine.  I must admit that this was the subject I was least looking forward to and I had dragged my feet to class.  I now realise how wrong I’ve been.

       I used to think of history as nothing more than a mere memorisation of dates, facts, and events.  After all, that was how it was taught in the Muggle schools I attended—through rote learning.  It was delightful hearing Professor Becker mention that dates are not as important, that what’s more important is to understand how people have shaped history—the ideas and the messages behind their words, actions, and causes.  That captivated my interest.

       History shouldn’t just be a simple recollection of the past, but as a way to learn to help the present and shape our future.  To cease the never-ending cycle of history repeating itself, to improve ourselves and become better wizards, to improve the world and make it a better place to live in, both in current times and for the future; that’s what’s essential.  A remembrance of the good-doings, of the triumphs and the bloodshed; to learn from the mistakes of the past and to keep the dark forces at bay—these are the reasons why it is necessary for students to study history.

       Although I’m new to the Wizarding world and have very little knowledge of magical history, I do know that a recurrence of Voldemort and the Death Eaters would be an atrocity.  A Third Wizarding War would cause widespread devastation.

Wise Words in History of Magic 101

history

“History is important to us because we are living it, because we are in it, and because we are going to make it. It is happening at every second, minute, and moment in time… History is also important to us because without it we cannot possibly hope to survive… There would be laws broken every day and wars breaking out every second, because we just wouldn’t know.”

— Professor Becker, History of Magic 101