History of Magic 101 — Assignment: Lesson 1

HOM-101 Assignment - Lesson 1

HOM-101 Assignment: Lesson 1

       Before the first lesson of the History of Magic, the topic of history was never a particular fancy of mine.  I must admit that this was the subject I was least looking forward to and I had dragged my feet to class.  I now realise how wrong I’ve been.

       I used to think of history as nothing more than a mere memorisation of dates, facts, and events.  After all, that was how it was taught in the Muggle schools I attended—through rote learning.  It was delightful hearing Professor Becker mention that dates are not as important, that what’s more important is to understand how people have shaped history—the ideas and the messages behind their words, actions, and causes.  That captivated my interest.

       History shouldn’t just be a simple recollection of the past, but as a way to learn to help the present and shape our future.  To cease the never-ending cycle of history repeating itself, to improve ourselves and become better wizards, to improve the world and make it a better place to live in, both in current times and for the future; that’s what’s essential.  A remembrance of the good-doings, of the triumphs and the bloodshed; to learn from the mistakes of the past and to keep the dark forces at bay—these are the reasons why it is necessary for students to study history.

       Although I’m new to the Wizarding world and have very little knowledge of magical history, I do know that a recurrence of Voldemort and the Death Eaters would be an atrocity.  A Third Wizarding War would cause widespread devastation.

Roots

herb

“Our roots affect who we become… Our identities are formed from the roots and up.

“…A muggle-born will grow up without the Tales of Beedle the Bard, half-bloods will know a balance of each world, whereas many pure-bloods will be at odds in the world of muggles.”

— Professor Tudor, Herbology 101

Wise Words in History of Magic 101

history

“History is important to us because we are living it, because we are in it, and because we are going to make it. It is happening at every second, minute, and moment in time… History is also important to us because without it we cannot possibly hope to survive… There would be laws broken every day and wars breaking out every second, because we just wouldn’t know.”

— Professor Becker, History of Magic 101

My Wand

wand

wand details

Black Walnut

Less common than the standard walnut wand, that of black walnut seeks a master of good instincts and powerful insight. Black walnut is a very handsome wood, but not the easiest to master. It has one pronounced quirk, which is that it is abnormally attuned to inner conflict, and loses power dramatically if its possessor practises any form of self-deception. If the witch or wizard is unable or unwilling to be honest with themselves or others, the wand often fails to perform adequately and must be matched with a new owner if it is to regain its former prowess. Paired with a sincere, self-aware owner, however, it becomes one of the most loyal and impressive wands of all, with a particular flair in all kinds of charmwork.

Unicorn

Unicorn hair generally produces the most consistent magic, and is least subject to fluctuations and blockages. Wands with unicorn cores are generally the most difficult to turn to the Dark Arts. They are the most faithful of all wands, and usually remain strongly attached to their first owner, irrespective of whether he or she was an accomplished witch or wizard. Minor disadvantages of unicorn hair are that they do not make the most powerful wands (although the wand wood may compensate) and that they are prone to melancholy if seriously mishandled, meaning that the hair may ‘die’ and need replacing.

10 ¾” in length

The following notes on wand length are taken from notes on the subject by Mr. Garrick Ollivander, wandmaker:

Most wands will be in the range of between nine and fourteen inches. While I have sold extremely short wands (eight inches and under) and very long wands (over fifteen inches), these are exceptionally rare. In the latter case, a physical peculiarity demanded the excessive wand length. However, abnormally short wands usually select those in whose character something is lacking, rather than because they are physically undersized (many small witches and wizards are chosen by longer wands).

Hard flexibility

The following notes on wand flexibility are taken from notes on the subject by Mr. Garrick Ollivander, wandmaker:

Wand flexibility or rigidity denotes the degree of adaptability and willingness to change possessed by the wand-and-owner pair – although, again, this factor ought not to be considered separately from the wand wood, core and length, nor of the owner’s life experience and style of magic, all of which will combine to make the wand in question unique.

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